Editor’s Letter: Summer 2016

 

What makes up the South? As one of our contributors, Carolyn Ogburn, put it, “there are as many Souths as there are Southerners, and each one of us reserves the right to secede from any union, any conversation.”  Our aim is to keep this conversation open and to continue to invite new insights into what makes up this strange, articulate, historically rich and complex region that is the American South.  Of course, the South is part of a larger national and global community. That is why WraparoundSouth features writers from all backgrounds and walks of life, although we always like to leave you with a taste of Southern when you’re done reading our pages.

This summer’s edition has special treats. Writer Lyn Millner, author of The Allure of Immortality reflects on her Southern identity in her essay, “The Free Country of Jones” when a recent blockbuster movie leads her to reconsider her Southern heritage and her personal obligations to her home land.  In “Trespasses” by Sam Wilkes we have a taste of Southern Gothic when an old Southern gentleman comes to butt heads with youngsters who do not respect the civility of older generations.  “Lucky Devil” by Jessica Simms invites us to speculate on the meaning of chance, the risks we take in even the smallest and seemingly insignificant decisions.  In “No Such Thing As Natural Disaster”, Carolyn Ogburn links the recent shooting massacre in Orlando with the hurricane disasters in Haiti and the social structures that lead to catastrophic consequences.  “Chicken Factory Handbook” by Jeffrey MacLachlan gives us a glimpse into the hardships of menial jobs, and “The Homes of CEOs” by John Grey reminds us that beauty cannot thrive where there are barriers..

…And so much more. Each of our selection is a window into a life, a thought, a way of living.  We hope you’ll spend some time with us, leafing through our digital pages.

Enjoy our summer literary selections, and don’t forget to visit our Backporch section where our contributors share stories and offer some good ole’ writerly wisdom.

Laura Valeri